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101 He moved to the Sweetwater Valley of Monroe County, Tennessee where he entered 160 acres of land in 1820. On January 4, 1810, in Washington County, TN, he purchased a negro boy about age 18 for $5--. On August 10, 1829 he conveyed his interes t in his fathers estate to Humphreys West. On 11/22/1825 Adam Sliger this day enters as general enterer, agreeably to law, the NE quarter of Section 14th, Township, 4rd, Range 1st east of meridian, Monroe County, Hiawasee District beginning on the NE corner of said quarter, Grant #1121. During the War of 1812, Adam Sliger was a Private in the 3rd Regiment, Johnson's East Tennessee Militia, entered as a substitute for Henry Sliger. His will, made 9/16/1834 reads: Adam Sligar State of Tennessee Monroe County In the name of God, Amen. I, Adam Sligar being sick in body but sound of mind and perfect memory considering the uncertainty of mortal life and the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof and to the end I may be the better prepa red to leave this world whenever it shall please God to call me hence do therefore make and delcare this my last will and testament in the following manner to with. I Will and Bequeath to my daughter Levinia the Tatiho man and one saddle worth twenty five dollars and one bed and furtniture. Also to my daughter Sally one bed and furniture. Also to my dauther Betsy McCalley the Shakespear colt. The ballanc e of my estate to be equally divided among my children with what some have already received. Peggy Wattenbarger one colt at twenty dollars and five dollars in chash, Hetty Kyker one cow at six dollars, John Sligar one cow at seven dollars fifty ce nts all of my personal property to be sold on twelve months credit the land disposed of at the descretion of my Executors to be sold or divided. All my slaves to be free at the age of thirty-five, Peter to be free whenever the present crop is secu re those that may be born hereafter the males to be free at the age of twenty one and females at the age of eighteen the slaves to be divided among the heirs if they can agree, if not if not their time to be sold and the money equally divided amon g the heirs. I authorise and appoint John Ramsey and my son Thomas Sligar of this my last will and testament signed in the presence of in the year of our Lord this 16th day of September 1834. Signed: His Mark: Adam Sligar Sliger, Adam J. (I2697)
 
102 Held considerable land, which he left to his son William, except for 95 acres to daughter Eleanor. Powell, William (I90)
 
103 High King of Britain son of Guorthigirn and Severa, daughter of Maximus the King who slew the king of the Romans Britain, Vortigern Vorteneu of (I3970)
 
104 His lands were laid out in 1685 at Westquadomset, where his sons settled, however his own home was situated on 'The Neck', near Providence. As early as 1672 he owned land north of the Inman Purchase, near 'Loquassuck', near Benjamin Hearnden . He also owned lands at Glocester, where several of his sons settled. Administration of his estate was granted to his widow Alice. Brown, Daniel (I3862)
 
105 http://www.dcs.hull.ac.uk Source (S20)
 
106 I received the following email concerning Allen Lewis: Allen Brown Lewis, born 1891 in Rabun, GA, died 1959 in Lisle, New York, and is buried there. He married in 1912 Maude Meadows of Toombs County, GA. They had three children: Genevieve, James, and Iris. He left this family and joined the army, I presume for World War I or approximately at that time. He went overseas and met a German girl named Gertrude and married her (without divorcing Maude). When they came back to the States, they settled in the Binghamton/Lisle, New York, area and had five children: James, Millard, Allen, Gertrude, and Irmegard. His Georgia family never knew what happened to him until after his death in 1959--his widow Gertrude contacted them and came down to Georgia to meet some of them. Allen Brown Lewis was my husband's grandfather. His daughter, Genevieve, was my husband's mother. Please write me and let me know how you came by your information. Thank you, Olivia saffold@pineland.net Lewis, Allen (I2928)
 
107 Immigrated in 1737 to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania aboard the 'Billender Townshead' from Amsterdam, Holland to Cowes, then to Philadelphia, arriving on October 5, 1737. Name appears as 'John Slyger' in the list of foreigners swearing allegiance to the province of Pennsylvania. Sailed with a party of 231 passengers, a colony of German Immigrants. Thomas Townsend was the master of the ship. Name changed to Slyger when he took the Oath. Christened: 23 June, 1702 in Wurttemberg, Steinheim Germany Was affiliated with the First Reformed Church while living in Lancaster County, PA. Later, moving to York County, PA, they were associated with the Christ Lutheran Church. Schleicher, Johann Georg (I2662)
 
108 Imperator Constantine I Constantinus, Flavius Valerius (I3974)
 
109 in 1676 willed land to Elizabeth IVES wife of Timothy IVES, Jr. Hurle, Joseph (I575)
 
110 In 1718 he conveyed land to his brother Daniel, and in 1719 he was arrested and sent to Newport. Further history is unknown Brown, Jonathan (I3871)
 
111 In 1930 Census of Precinct 21, Palm Beach Florida, was listed as a Movie Theatre Operator. Bair, Howard E. (I4224)
 
112 In the 1880 Wayne County, GA Census, he lists his birth place (as well as his parents) as Florida. Brown, Martin Monroe (I610)
 
113 It is not proven that Mildred's last name is Bryant. It is assumed that Bryant may be her last name, as the middle name of their first son was Bryant. Rollings, Millicent (I22)
 
114 James EGGLESTON was born about 1617 in England. He died on 1 December 1679 in Connecticut. He came to America with his father, Bygod EGGLESTON in 1630. He became a freeman in 1637. He fought in the Pequot Indian War. For this he was granted 50 acres in 167 Eggleston, James (I5354)
 
115 Jean Magny was born in New York City, August 31, 1698 to parents Jean Magny and Jeanne Stadt Machet and was baptized September 28 in the French Huguenot Church of Saint Esprit. At the christening his father and his Aunt Marianne were his sponsors . He was the second child but first son in the family of three or four children. His father was a mariner, and even perhaps a pirate, so probably was absent from home much of the time. Jean eventually had his named changed to 'John Many' to conform more to English North America. The sons of John and their descendants are found with many variations of the spelling: Manney, Manny, Manna, Manni, Manning, etc. Little has been found respecting the lives of those in this family. John signed the Act of Opposition of September 24, 1724, regarding the dismissal of the Reverend Mr. Rou from the French Church in New York. In the records of the Reverend Mr. Sal mon of Long Island, New York, John Many and Ann Wines were married on January 23, 1728/29. Even the births of the children have been gleaned only from the tombstones, and other sketchy evidence. This dirth of evidence is thought to result from th e opinion that the family lived in the West Indies. This would be logical since John's parents and grandparents, on his mother's side, had substantial economic interests there. John Many and Ann Wines had four sons: John Wines, Barnabas, James and Gabriel. The first born was known by his middle name 'Wines'. Wines, James and Gabriel became carpenters, constructing the Colden Mansion, a large house about six miles wes t of Newburgh, New York, whose date-stone says it was built in 1767. Wines became a land holder in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, NY. James became a farmer at Poughkeepsie, as did Barnabas at Craigsville. Many, Jean John (I4101)
 
116 John and Mary were members of the Emanuel Lutheran Church, also known as 'The Old Dutch Meeting House'. Many of their children and other relatives also belonged to this church where services were held in both German and English. In the cemeter y of this church is an old headstone marked: 'M. Schleiger, died 1855'. This is most likely the stone of Mary Harmon Sliger, as she disappeared sometime between the 1850 and 1860 census. Sliger, John (I2659)
 
117 John and wife Nancy are buried at Myatt Farm, Webb Cemetery in Monroe County, Kentucky. John and Nancy are listed in the 1870 Monroe County, Kentucky Census, and in Deed Book 11, pg 451 of Sullivan County, Tennessee where Alexander Hale and wife Sarah Billingsley sold to John Arterburn 213 acres of land bordered by Sinking Creek fo r $900 dated 11/21/1835. There are several more entries in Washington County, TN of John buying and selling land, and one entry granting him power of attorney for the Jones family date 8/28/1843. An interesting entry in the Monroe County, Kentucky Court Minutes book from 12/3/1866, signed by John Arterburn, 'John Arterburn, Master of Serada Arterburn, a poor child of color of Monroe County, Kentucky, to be bound as an apprentice to John un til 18 for the purpose of learning the art and trade of housewifery. She is 10 years as of September, 1866. He is to feed and clothe her and giver her proper medical attention and a suit of clothes and $50.00 or learn her to read and write.' Arterburn, John (I2401)
 
118 John Brown was a famous abolutionist and was executed by hanging after an unsuccessful raid on the federal armory at Harper's Ferry that resulted in his capture. Brown, John (I5602)
 
119 John Many was the son of Jean Magny and Jeanne Machet. John Many Jean Magny was born in New York City, August 31, 1698 to parents Jean Magny and Jeanne Stadt Machet and was baptized September 28 in the French Huguenot Church of Saint Esprit. At the christening his father and his AuntMarianne were his sponsors . He was the second child but first son in the family of three or four children. His father was a mariner, and evenperhaps a pirate, so probably was absent from home much of the time. Jean eventually had his named changed to 'John Many' to conform more to English North America. The sons of John and their descendants are found with many variations of the spelling: Manney, Manny, Manna, Manni, Manning, etc. Little has been found respecting the lives of those in this family. John signed the Act of Opposition of September 24, 1724, regarding the dismissal of the Reverend Mr. Rou from the French Church in New York. In the records of the Reverend Mr. Sal mon of Long Island, New York, John Many and Ann Wines were married on January 23, 1728/29. Even the births of the children have been gleaned only from the tombstones, and other sketchy evidence. This dirth of evidence is thought to result from th e opinion that the family lived in the West Indies. This would be logical since John's parents and grandparents, on his mother's side, had substantial economic interests there. John Many and Ann Wines had four sons: John Wines, Barnabas, James and Gabriel. The first born was known by his middle name 'Wines'. Wines, James and Gabriel became carpenters, constructing the Colden Mansion, a large house about six miles west of Newburgh, New York, whose date-stone says it was built in 1767. Wines became a land holder in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, NY. James became a farmer at Poughkeepsie, as did Barnabas at Craigsville. Many, Jean John (I4101)
 
120 Joined the Confederate Army 5/25/1861 at Knoxville, TN for 12 months. He was mustered in at Cumberland Gap, Virginia, 8/15/1861. At roll call in December 1861, he was absent sick. He was listed as a prisoner of war on December 10, 1863, capture d at Clevland, TN, and was transferred to Rockford, Illinois prison from Louisville Kentucky on 11 December 1863. Sliger, Henry Martin (I3107)
 
121 Killed by a train. Purdom, Franklin James Monroe (I223)
 
122 Killed in the Spanish-American War Sliger, Andrew Jackson (I3210)
 
123 King Manwgan of Powys AFT 0613. ˇOne theory asserts that this, the death of Selyd, led to an invasion of Powys by Eluadd ap Glast (alias Eluan Powys), the erstwhile King of Dogfeiling. The usurper probably managed to hold the throne for some thirty years or more before he was ki lled fighting the Northumbrians, possibly at the Battle of Maes-Cogwy (Oswestry) in 642. The Dogfeiling dynasty was finally crushed by the Saxons around 656, and Manwgan was able to take his rightful place on the Powysian throne 0613. ˇappears to have been a very small boy when his father, Selyf Sarffgadau (Battle-Snake) was killed at the Battle of Caer-Legion (Chester) (1 <../sources/sou0004.html>) Powys, Manwgan ap Selyfan o (I3991)
 
124 King of Alclud Damnonii, Ceretic Guletic of the (I4006)
 
125 King of England Tudor, Henry VIII (I4184)
 
126 King of England 1457 - 1509. First ruler of the house of Tudor, whose reign initiated a period of national unity following the strife of the 15th century. The reorganization in 1487 of the Star Chamber was one of several means by which Henry stren gthened the royal power over the nobles Tudor, Henry VII (I4180)
 
127 King of Gwynedd Gwynedd, Gryffydd ap Cynan o (I3933)
 
128 King of Scotland James IV (I4190)
 
129 King of Scotland V, James (I4191)
 
130 King of Strathclyde Ceretic, Erp map (I4004)
 
131 Known as the 'Waggonmaker'. Landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1738 with his parents. He relocated to Salisburg, NC about 1759. Jacob served in the NC Militia against the Indian raids. Braun, Johan Jacob (I2712)
 
132 Later married her brother-in-law Henry VIII Tudor Aragon, Catherine of (I4189)
 
133 Lind Cemetery, Waupaca Wisconsin Eggleston, John Chase (I57)
 
134 Listed in 1850 Census, Roane County, TN Roll #893, Family #44 Listed in 1840 Census, Washington County, TN - M704, Roll #535, page 226 Listed in 1830 Census, Washington County, TN - M19, Roll #175, page 227 Paid taxes on 360 acres valued at $1500.00 in District 9 of Roane County in 1864. Sliger, William (I2646)
 
135 Listed in the 1870 Federal Mortality Census, cause of death Pneumonia. Eggleston, William (I5313)
 
136 Lord Methven I Stewart, Henry (I4194)
 
137 Maiden name also seen as Haskins Hoskins, Grace (I5353)
 
138 Many genealogy tree's have John Caries death date as 1681. In a discussion at Ancestry.com they note the actual source documents read 1631. They comment that some one may have wrote 1631 in handwriting and then misread it as 1681 when entering it into their computer. Carey, John (I5302)
 
139 Marriage Bond recorded on pg. 309 in McMinn County, TN. on April 14, 1902. Marriage performed by J.F. Garrison, J.P. April 19, 1902. Family F37
 
140 Marriage information provided in a letter from Glen & Edna Collier, 2317 Catalina, Mesquite, Texas, 75150 (214) 279-8485 dated 11/25/1992 written to Mrs. Mary O. Cavett, Box 242, Sweetwater, TN 37874. Jane Arterburn was the gr. gr. grandmothe r of Glen Collier. Arterburn, Jane (I2407)
 
141 Marriage is on record in Jonesboro, Tennessee. Family F619
 
142 Mary Ann may have been a DENNISON or may have been the widow of a DENNISON.

Unreturned Marriage License Dated September 15, 1810 Thomas Purdom to Marian Pearson. 
Dennison, Marian (I10)
 
143 Master of the Household to Charles II and James II Bulkeley, Henry (I4686)
 
144 May have married a Stark/Starkes Browne, Augusta (I4320)
 
145 May have settled in Morgan County, Georgia after 1790. Powell, Nathan (I3736)
 
146 Mrs Guy Roberts, 81, 1640 Maint St., died at St. Michael's Hospital on Sunday.

Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Boston Funeral Home. The Rev. Herbert Thompson of St. Paul's United Methodist Church will officiate. Burial will be held in the Forest cemetery.

Friends may call after 2 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. A memorial has been established in her name.

Mrs. Roberets, formerly Gail W. Jakway, was born Sept 10, 1889 in the Town of Lind, Waupaca County, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Jakway.

She attended schools in the Town of Lind and Waupaca and was a graduate of Stevens Point Normal. She taught in Scandinavia and Bancroft and furing World War II was a teacher at Wilson School in Portage County.

She was married to Guy Roberts on May 17, 1913. They settled in Stevens Point.

Survivors include her husband Guy; two sons, Rober, Rhinelander and Guy Jr., Appleton; two daughters, Mrs. Harold (Marian) Welke, Sheboygan and Mrs. Collin (Margaret) Schroeder, Madison, and nine granchildren.

She was preceded in death by one son, Richard, who was killed in World War II. 
Jakway, Abigail Winifred (I4329)
 
147 Never Married - Killed in Civil War Arterburn, John Elzie (I2418)
 
148 No record of him after 1860, aged 17. Believed to have died young. Sliger, Adam (I2688)
 
149 Notes from the family Bible of Hubert Richardson indicate that Adam Sliger married Mary Sliger, the daughter of Adam Sliger. In the 1880 McMinn County, Tennessee Census, she states that she was born in Tennessee, her father was born in Tennesse e and her mother was born in North Carolina. Sliger, Mary (I2475)
 
150 Notes: John Southwell, in 1349, the 22d of Edward III, was made chief officer for the King, in the country of Cork in Ireland, for life, on the attainder of Thomas Earl of Desmond, with power to make a deputy, for as much as he was always attendan t on the King's person. In the 34th of the said King, John de Southwell, was D'ni. Regis clericus, probably clerk of the King, and had a pension of 10 marks per ann. His son, Richard Southwell, was high sheriff of Kent in the 48th of Edward III , and Nicholas Southwell was groom of the bedchamber to King Richard II and sent by him in 1388, to the King of France, with credentials. Southwell, John (I4163)
 

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